From: The Language of letting go

“How much do we need to let go of?” a friend asked one day.
“I’m not certain,” I replied, “but maybe everything.”
Letting go is a spiritual, emotional, mental and physical process, a sometimes mysterious metaphysical process of releasing to God and the Universe that which we are clinging to so tightly.
We let go of our grasp on people, outcomes, ideas, feelings, wants, needs, desires – everything. We let go of trying to control       our progress in recovery. Yes, it’s important to acknowledge and accept what we want and what we want to happen. But it’s equally important to follow through by letting go.
Letting go is the action part of faith. It is a behavior that gives God and the Universe permission to send us what we’re meant to have. Letting go means we acknowledge that hanging on so tightly isn’t helping to solve the problem, change the person or get the outcome we desire.  t isn’t helping us. In fact, we learn that hanging on often blocks us from getting what we want and need.
Who are we to say that things aren’t happening exactly as they need to happen?
There is magic in letting go. Sometimes we get what we want soon after we let go. Sometimes it takes longer. Sometimes the specific outcome we desire doesn’t happen. Something better does.
Letting go sets us free and connects us to our Source.
Letting go creates the optimum environment for the best possible outcomes and solutions.
Today, I will relax. I will let go of that which is upsetting me the most. I will trust that by letting go. I have started the wheels in motion for things to work out in the best possible way.
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2 thoughts on “From: The Language of letting go

  1. Letting go takes work however one big benefit from letting go, is that failure, worry, guilt and shame, that are attached to the ego go along.

    Desire to judge, categorize, approve, disapprove can eat up most of your life.

    Anytime spent not letting go but engaged in thought is wasted and can do harm to our mental wellbeing.

    The only place happiness exists is in the present moment, then it leaves for the next moment. It does not even care about the last moment after it is gone. Why should we?

    Healing can intensify and trauma can be integrated much more quickly than therapists believe. Most have never had to make it minute to minute when the nervous system is completely aroused with cortisol.

    You get the basics but a much larger task looms as the egos lure can be quite adept.

    Like

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